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NCERT Solutions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

NCERT Solutions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

NCERT Solutions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Exercises

Question:- 1. How is food security ensured in India?

Answer:- The Indian government carefully built a food security system, which consists of two components: (a) buffer stock and (b) public distribution system, to ensure that food is available to all sections of society. In India, food security is provided in the following ways:

  1. Food availability – food produced in the country and government stocks from the previous year
  2. Food accessibility — food is accessible to all people of the country.
  3. Food affordability — everyone should be able to purchase food which is both safe and healthy.

Question:- 2. Which are the people more prone to food insecurity?

Answer:- The people who are more prone to food insecurity are landless or land-poor households in rural areas, as well as persons working in low-wage jobs and seasonal workers in urban areas.

Question:- 3. Which states are more food insecure in India?

Answer:- Eastern and south-eastern parts of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Orissa, West Bengal, Chhattisgarh, and parts of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra are more food insecure states of India.

Question:- 4. Do you believe that green revolution has made India self-sufficient in food grains? How?

Answer:- India has become self-sufficient in food grains because of Green Revolution. Since the early 1970s, when the Green Revolution began, the country has avoided famines despite poor meteorological circumstances. The Green Revolution has resulted in a wide range of crops being grown across the country.

Question:- 5. A section of people in India are still without food. Explain?

Answer:- Because of the seasonal nature of agricultural work, a segment of the population is insecure for a few months when they are unemployed. They work in seasonal jobs and are paid pitiful wages that barely cover their basic needs. At times it so occurs that they have to stay without food.

Question:- 6. What happens to the supply of food when there is a disaster or a calamity?

Answer:- When a disaster or calamity strikes, food grain production and agriculture are severely harmed. Production falls, resulting in a lack of food grains and, as a result, higher food grain prices. If the tragedy lasts for an extended period of time, the afflicted area may become food insecure.

Question:- 7. Differentiate between seasonal hunger and chronic hunger?

Answer:- Seasonal hunger is linked to food growing and harvesting seasons, but chronic hunger is caused by diets that are consistently deficient in quantity or quality.

People in rural areas and urban areas suffer from seasonal hunger due to the seasonal nature of agricultural activities and causal labour, whereas poor people suffer from chronic hunger due to very low income and thus inability to buy food even for minimal survival.

Question:- 8. What has our government done to provide food security to the poor? Discuss any two schemes launched by the government?

Answer:- Two unique projects were developed in 2000 to assist the underprivileged and provide them with food security. They were the Antyodaya Anna Yojana (AAY) and the Annapurna Scheme (APS), both of which had specific target groups of ‘poorest of the poor’ and ‘indigent senior citizens,’ respectively. These two systems were intertwined with the existing network’s operation.

Question:- 9. Why buffer stock is created by the government?

Answer:- The Indian government carefully built a food security system, which consists of two components: (a) buffer stock and (b) public distribution system, to ensure that food is available to all sections of society. This is done in order to distribute foodgrains at a cheaper cost than the market price in deficient areas and among the poorer classes of society.

Question:- 10. Write notes on:

(a) Minimum support price

Answer:- Farmers are paid a set price for their crops in advance. This is known as the Minimum Support Price. Every year, before the sowing season, the government announces the MSP in order to offer farmers with incentives to increase crop production.

(b) Buffer stock

Answer:- Buffer Stock is the stock of food grains, especially wheat and rice bought by the government through Food Corporation of India (FCI).

(c) Issue price

Answer:- Buffer stock is developed to distribute food grains in deficient areas and to the poorer strata of society at a lower price than the market price, also known as the Issue Price. This also helps in resolving the problem of food scarcity during inclement weather or natural disasters.

 (d) Fair price shops

Answer:- The FCI purchases food and distributes it to the poorest members of society through government-run ration shops. The public distribution system is what it’s called (PDS). Ration shops can now be found in most towns, villages, and cities. Ration shops can be found in roughly 4.6 lakh locations across the country. Ration shops, also known as Fair Price Shops, stock food grains, sugar, and cooking kerosene oil. People are sold these things for a lesser price.

Question:- 11. What are the problems of the functioning of ration shops?

Answer:- There are issues with the ration shops’ operation:

  1. Food offered to the poor is of lower quality than that anticipated of foodgrains.
  2. Ration shop operators commit fraud by failing to supply the impoverished with the full amount they are entitled to.
  3. Some ration shops are not open on a regular basis, which causes hardship for the poor.
  4. In the sake of the impoverished, the ration shopkeepers even update incorrect entries.

Question:- 12. Write a note on the role of cooperatives in providing food and related items.

Answer:- Cooperatives also play a vital role in India’s food security, particularly in the country’s southern and western regions. Cooperative organisations established shops to sell low-cost goods to the underprivileged. Cooperatives, for example, run nearly all of the fair price stores in Tamil Nadu, accounting for about 94 percent of the total.