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Autism Awareness Month

Autism Awareness Month

Autism, also called autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a complicated condition that includes problems with communication and behavior. It can involve a wide range of symptoms and skills. ASD can be a minor problem or a disability that needs full-time care in a special facility.

People with autism have trouble with communication. They have trouble understanding what other people think and feel. This makes it hard for them to express themselves, either with words or through gestures, facial expressions, and touch.

The following are some of the most common autistic symptoms:

  • Inability to make eye contact
  • A limited range of interests or a strong desire to learn more about a specific topic
  • Repeating something, such as repeating words or phrases, rocking back and forth, or flipping a lever, over and over.
  • High sensitivity to sounds, sensations, scents, or sights that most people consider normal
  • I’m not looking at or listening to anyone else.
  • When someone points something out to you, you don’t look at it.
  • Reluctance to be held or cuddled
  • Speech, gestures, facial expressions, or voice tone are difficult to interpret or use.
  • Using a sing-song, flat, or robotic tone of voice
  • Having difficulty adjusting to changes in routine

Autism Awareness Month is a busy time for organisations and individuals raising cash, boosting awareness, and breaking down stigmas. It’s a great moment to think on your own awareness and behaviours, as well as those of your family. Autism awareness, however, should not be limited to a single month of the year. It is something that should be done on a daily basis.

Here are five proactive things you can do throughout the year:

1. Get educated on your own. Individual responsibility for one’s own self-awareness is the first step toward awareness. Do your share to learn more about autism (and what it isn’t) and how to communicate with autistic people more effectively. Keep an open mind and concentrate on what these people can do rather than what they may struggle with. You may assist others comprehend autism if you have a better knowledge of it.

2. Participate in local events. Participate actively in autism awareness and events in your community. Many organisations have local chapters and hold events all year. Show your support while learning more about their efforts by bringing your family or friends.

Here are five proactive things you can do throughout the year:

1. Get educated on your own. Individual responsibility for one’s own self-awareness is the first step toward awareness. Do your share to learn more about autism (and what it isn’t) and how to communicate with autistic people more effectively. Keep an open mind and concentrate on what these people can do rather than what they may struggle with. You may assist others comprehend autism if you have a better knowledge of it.

2. Participate in local events. Participate actively in autism awareness and events in your community. Many organisations have local chapters and hold events all year. Show your support while learning more about their efforts and demonstrating that you care by bringing your family or friends. Even better, become involved with these organisations and activities as a volunteer.

3. Act as a spokesperson. Speak up for autistic children and adults. Allowing others to put them down or speak poorly about them is not a good idea. Tell us about your experience. Ensure that people with special needs are welcomed and respected at work, and that they are treated with the same respect as everyone else. With the correct assistance, people with autism can be as successful as everyone else.

4. Speak up for yourself. Concerning potential legislation that impacts people with autism, write or phone your state lawmakers, local legislators, or other officials. Be mindful of the implications of these policies on access to services, insurance, research, and other issues. Encourage people to follow your lead. Every person’s opinion matters.

5. Act as a positive role model for others. When it comes to autism, pay attention to your own actions and words. When connecting with others and assisting those with autism to thrive, set a good example for your children (and community). Assist them in feeling accepted and a part of your life.

It all starts with you and your activities to raise autism awareness. We can break down stigmas and improve acceptance when everyone works together.